Tasting Notes – Spirits Edition: Forbidden Fruit from Lee Spirits Company

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The Tantalus cocktail featuring Forbidden Fruit Liqueur from Lee Spirits Company. Photo Credit- Guillermo Woolfolk/Mashing In

For this special installment of Tasting Notes, we take advantage of the exciting opportunity to sample and work with Forbidden Fruit, a nearly forgotten liqueur that has been recently resurrected by Lee Spirits Company (Colorado Springs, Colorado).

First created in the late 1800s, Forbidden Fruit, a citrus-based liqueur, at one time grew to such popularity that it was frequently mentioned as an ingredient in The Savoy Cocktail Book and The Café Royal Cocktail Book – two highly-respected tomes from the 1930’s that now chronicle the history of classic cocktails. Never heard of it? Well, the reason for that stems from the moment it was “acquired from the original producers by the Jacquin Company.”  This move set the stage for Forbidden Fruit to oddly meet its demise in 1970’s when the Jacquin Company decided to “[repurpose] the bottle design for their new Chambord Raspberry Liqueur.” Production of Forbidden Fruit completely ceased, leaving “classic cocktail enthusiasts . . . no choice but to try to substitute Forbidden Fruit with another ingredient or to recreate it themselves” . . . until Lee Spirits Company showed up.

Staying true to their “mission to authentically recreate classic cocktail ingredients”, the folks at Lee Spirits “scoured auction houses, purchased unopened bottles of original Forbidden Fruit Liqueur“, and reverse engineered Forbidden Fruit’s flavor and experience “as accurately as absolutely possible.”  After building a recipe containing “white grapefruit, honey, and a blend of spices”, Lee Spirits Company can now confidently declare that “it’s nearly impossible to tell the difference” between their version and the original in a side-by-side comparison. Due to Lee Spirits Company’s dedication and commitment to the revival of this historic liqueur, a wealth of classic cocktails can now resurface, and Forbidden Fruit can once again inspire new creations developed at bars around the country.

Forbidden Fruit is available now in 750ml bottles and can be found at fine retailers located in Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

Now that the storied history of Forbidden Fruit has been covered, let’s get into these Tasting Notes so that we can finally experience what we have been missing for all these years.

Tasting Notes for Forbidden Fruit from Lee Spirits Company

Appearance: Forbidden Fruit is packaged in a tall, slender bottle that is adorned with a white label bearing a clean, mostly black and gray design that gets a just a pop of color from the illustrated grapefruit and spices.  The liqueur is extremely pale yellow in color and slightly cloudy, making its presentation somewhat reminiscent of freshly squeezed lemon juice.  When jostled, the liquid coats every part of the glass it encounters with an oil slick that impressively draws some lengthy and long-lasting legs.

Aroma: Citrus forward, the aromatics lead with a grapefruit character spiked with bit of sweet orange juice.  A lovely honey presence then builds and carries with it earthy and floral cardamom notes.  Coriander closes the profile with a complex, citrus quality that brings the grapefruit back up front.

Taste: The spices strike first here with floral cardamom, citrusy coriander and just a touch of cinnamon.  The citrus and honey then surface simultaneously to supply notes of candied grapefruit and orange.  Underneath it all, there is a soft undertone of creamy vanilla that further tempers the grapefruit with another layer of sweetness.

Mouthfeel:  Slightly syrupy and sticky in texture, Forbidden Fruit coats the palate with a healthy helping of sweetness.  That said, there is a touch of citrus-sourced bitterness that adds some dimension to the liqueur’s sweet character.  All those fermentable sugars produce an 32% ABV that offers some building – but not overwhelming – heat in the throat.  Honey and vanilla linger in the aftertaste.

Final Thoughts: On description alone, we were expecting Forbidden Fruit to be more of a bittering liqueur . . . but our ignorant expectation for something one dimensional was way off.  Instead, we were met with a dynamically complex spirit that is citrusy and floral, sweet and gently bitter, earthy and spicy.  Above all, it is just ridiculously unique.

Obviously, Forbidden Fruit is not necessarily meant to be a stand-alone spirit consumed neat like we did for the Tasting Notes above.  Its place is in a delicious cocktail, so we decided to continue our tasting journey by shaking up a Tantalus, a classic cocktail that also vanished when Forbidden Fruit met its fate in the 70’s.

Tantalus

  • 3/4 oz. Brandy or Gin (we went with Lee Spirits Dry Gin)
  • 3/4 oz. Forbidden Fruit
  • 3/4 oz. Lemon Juice
  • 1/4 oz. Honey

Add all ingredients to a shaker tin filled with ice and shake. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Garnish with a lemon twist.

The recipe makes it so the herbs in the Dry Gin and the spices in the Forbidden Fruit are smoothed out and dialed back. This leaves incredibly bright citrus notes (tart lemon & grapefruit) and a floral honey presence with the opportunity to shine.  Any sweetness from the honey and Forbidden Fruit is balanced beautifully by the lemon juice and gin, resulting in an incredibly refreshing cocktail that drinks dry and disappears about as quickly as it is poured.

After experiencing just how delicious Forbidden Fruit and the Tantalus cocktail are, it is difficult to understand why this liqueur so easily faded away into obscurity.  With the bright but balanced flavors in Forbidden Fruit having the amazing ability to complement and enhance so many different kinds of spirits and mixers, its decades-long absence just does not make any sense.

The time is now and long overdue for Forbidden Fruit.  Whether you own a bar that specializes or dabbles in the cocktails of yore or are just a home bartender that enjoys wowing guests with classic-style cocktails, you need to have some Forbidden Fruit on hand.  Not only will this help you step up your cocktail game, but you will also play a pivotal role in assisting Forbidden Fruit reclaim its significant place in cocktail culture.  Prost!

 

 

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Lee Spirits Co. Expands Distribution to Include Texas

LeeSpiritsLogoLee Spirits Company (Colorado Springs, Colorado) has officially announced that it will launch distribution in Texas this July with four products: Dry GinForbidden Fruit LiqueurCreme de Rose and Creme de Violette.

Founded in 2013 by cousins Nick and Ian Lee, Lee Spirits Company was formed with a mission “to develop and manufacture the finest Gin in Colorado and the United States along with accompanying liqueurs that would fit into classic cocktail recipes exactly as originally written” and to one day distribute those “products in retail outlets across the nation and globe.”  That vision has steadily coming to fruition over the last five years as several Lee Spirits offerings have won awards and the distillery has gradually expanded distribution to include Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and now Texas.

“Our team worked tirelessly to complete the deal with our Texas partners,” said Ian Lee, co-founder of Lee Spirits Company. “Texas marks the next step in our growth as a company. In addition, we are excited to launch our products in additional states in the upper Midwest and Eastern Seaboard by the end of 2018. Witnessing our brand’s planned-growth from small a southern Colorado distiller to a company pointed toward national and global distribution is a testament to hard work and dedication.”

Lee Spirits will enter the Texas market with the following four offerings (all descriptions sourced from the distillery’s website):

  • Dry Gin – Our flagship product. Created with original prohibition-era cocktails in mind. We make it just like it would have been made in 1920. It features a floral nose with an earthy finish. Goes perfect in a martini and any recipe from Jerry Thomas’ 1862 Bartender’s Guide.  ABV – 45%  (90 PROOF)
  • Forbidden Fruit Liqueur – Containing white grapefruit, honey, and a blend of spices, Lee Spirits’ Forbidden Fruit Liqueur is perfect to create authentic classic cocktails or to add a unique flavor to your modern creations.  ABV – 32%  (64 PROOF)
  • Creme de Rose – Creme de Rose is created in an American manner of traditional creme liqueurs. Freshly picked red and pink petals combine to recreate this traditional liqueur that brings a floral sweetness to any cocktail or pour it over ice and sip it on its own.  ABV – 30%  (60 PROOF)
  • Creme de Violette – American made product kept honest to its American roots. Our traditional recipe blends botanicals that recreate a Crème de Violette that allows you to reminisce about the past and leads you into the future.  ABV – 30%  (60 PROOF)

These Lee Spirits products will be available in the state of Texas beginning in July 2018.  You can expect to find these fine offerings available in retail stores located in Austin, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and several other cities throughout Texas.  Prost!

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